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9

Yes! The trick is to count each input with its effective value rather than its nominal value. Transactions are composed of three parts: the overhead, the inputs and the outputs. Outputs: The size of the output scripts is determined by the recipient addresses, so their size is given by the transaction instructions. We do not know whether we will need a ...


8

Blockchain.com is a wallet service and provides a "blockchain explorer". The company is named after the Bitcoin network's transaction journal, the blockchain. Bitcoin is a permissionless peer-to-peer network. Users interact with the network by running software that implements the Bitcoin protocol. There are various types of software that interact ...


7

Where can I see the blockchain without going to blockchain.com? Other blockchain explorers Use your favourite search engine to find other "blockchain explorers" If you run a full-node wallet like Bitcoin core Access your local copy of the blockchain. For example, Bitcoin core on Windows stores it in %APPDATA%\Bitcoin You can examine this copy ...


5

Kind of, but coin selection is hard in general. The idea is that inputs pay for themselves. It is easy to compute how much in fees you will need to pay for an input at a given fee rate. So when you do coin selection, instead of selecting on the actual value of the input, you use the value of the input minus the fees it will pay. This is known as the ...


4

The blockchain is information. It is not a "thing," and it is copied wherever one wishes to have it. Distributed systems like this are interesting, and it may help to think about a heretical phrasing: a blockchain. That's right. There is more than one. A blockchain is any set of information (i.e. bytes) which describes a valid block chain. ...


4

How Bitcoin nodes validate a new wallet They don't Bitcoin nodes validate blocks and they validate the transactions within those blocks Other nodes don't have access to your wallet and can't validate it or anything in it. I mean, what if this wallet already exist? No one knows or cares if the private-key initially generated by your wallet already exists. ...


3

I understand these wallets only work with provider's mobile app, online interface or their computer software, correct ? No. Some of the most popular hardware wallets are supported by third party software. For example, Trezors and Ledgers can be used with Electrum who have implemented support for these devices directly. Other wallet software like Wasabi ...


2

Addresses contain the network byte (hence old-style addresses start with 1 or 3) the 20-byte public key hash, and a checksum that doesn't let you lose funds if you mistype the recipient. If the checksum is wrong, your wallet will warn you. There's no way to prove that a public key hash was derived from a known public key. For example there's a corresponding ...


2

what is exactly the meaning of reserve and change? My guess is that reserve are normal reception addresses and change are, well, change, but I'm still wondering if there's some meaning more specific to Bitcoin Core. reserve means that the key is in the keypool and has not been used yet. This is used for both change and receiving addresses as there are ...


2

No, not all passphrases are used to generate the private keys for a wallet. Only specifically brain wallets do that. Passphrases in actual wallet software like Bitcoin Core and Electrum are used to encrypt the wallet. The private keys are still randomly and securely generated. Your passphrase is only used as an encryption key so that the private keys are ...


1

From Bitcoin Wiki: Wallet encryption uses AES-256-CBC to encrypt only the private keys that are held in a wallet. The keys are encrypted with a master key which is entirely random. This master key is then encrypted with AES-256-CBC with a key derived from the passphrase using SHA-512 and OpenSSL's EVP_BytesToKey and a dynamic number of rounds determined by ...


1

I personally like Blockstream Green as in addition to being simple to use, it has many features about security and privacy


1

Unused addresses are unrelated to mining activity. Even if you were mining, you will still see many unused addresses. The Bitcoin earned from mining would be associated with a used address. Bitcoin Core by default will generate 1000 (previously 100) unused keys to be used in the "keypool". The keypool is the pool of unused keys and is used as a ...


1

Bitcoin Core is primarily a node (also known as a peer) intended to join the Bitcoin network. It includes wallet functionality, but its primary purpose is to interact with the Bitcoin p2p network, and help validate all blocks and transactions for adherence to the consensus rules, which are encoded in the Bitcoin Core source code. Due to this, it also ...


1

Blockchain.com is an explorer, and like most explorers, it will show any transactions that spend from that address as well. If there are no such transactions, then the received coins have not been spent yet. Note that even if such transactions are visible, it is not guaranteed that you will be able to identify where the coins were sent. Addresses are ...


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