Hot answers tagged

29

The address received 0.07014343 BTC in 3d727e3f4565e011c0348f813c2d5480210b6bae2003a0f7abaa949d1a7c599a. These coins have already been spent, so at the very least the recipient's wallet provider is aware of the transaction. Depending on the type of wallet, the recipient's account may not have been credited due to internal system issues. Alternatively, the ...


22

This is mainly adding to @Raghav Sood's answer: A quick google search brought me here from which I found this: https://blockexplorer.com/ Searching your bitcoin address in this website gives some data related to bitcoin transaction concerning this particular address (including the one mentioned on the other answer), plus some more statistics. For ...


4

A path can have, at most, 256 elements, including the master. This limitation comes from the extended public key serialization format's depth field. This field is a single byte which means it only has 256 possible values.


3

No, you cannot use that value for that purpose. Bitcoin Core does not support publicly derivable addresses at all (at this point).


2

Wasabi Wallet is usable right now. "When will it be ready for mainstream use" is a question of opinion / service availability, and those are off-topic here. See the help centre for more info. And who is validating the transactions in the wasabi wallet ? Is it a SPV concept or full node, or centralized, owned by wasabi company servers? The Wasabi server ...


2

Largely, this question boils down to one thing: does the wallet software let you control the private keys for your coins? Or not? If the wallet does not let you control your own keys (ie a custodial wallet), then it is up to the custodian to craft and publish your transactions. Obviously, this gives the custodian ability to censor your transactions at will. ...


2

Is there any software or organization that can verify whether wallet is secure or not? You can use an open source wallet and take the time to read and understand all the code and then compile it yourself. This would be an unfeasably large task for most ordinary people. Software developers might find it a bit easier but it is still a large amount of work. ...


1

There is no way to convert the resulting seed back to the original mnemonic. As stated in the BIP 39 proposal: To create a binary seed from the mnemonic, we use the PBKDF2 function with a mnemonic sentence (in UTF-8 NFKD) used as the password and the string "mnemonic" + passphrase (again in UTF-8 NFKD) used as the salt. The seed (and optional ...


1

To clarify, what you exported is a private key for an address. A wallet is a collection of addresses and their private keys. The amount that you think is associated with that address is most definitely not the actual amount. What has most likely happened is that you have made a transaction in the past which spent some of those coins and the remainder has ...


1

The answer is simple: Ledger is not a wallet, it's a device to improve the security of a wallet. Everything depends on what wallet you use it with. It's a hardware signing device. They're often called "hardware wallets", but that is a misleading name. It does not manage your money, or send or receive transactions. It's simply a secure, offline, device to ...


1

getbalance returns the balance that your node currently considers spendable. According to your console output, the transaction that sent you the output was flagged as "bip125-replaceable"=>"yes". Since a transaction flagged as replaceable can be amended or retracted by the sender until it gets confirmed, an output from such a transaction will not be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible