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9

It looks like https://bitcoincore.org/ is the one run by the people who run the Github bitcoin/bitcoin project (the actual core developers) since it is the one listed on their Github page: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin If you want the absolute best source for the client directly from Bitcoin Core devs then I would use that site or their Github page for ...


4

I'm the CEO at Muun wallet. Muun does rely on backups since the Emergency Kit is a backup, just not using mnemonics. The problem with mnemonics is that they don't contain a lot of stuff needed for the recovery of a multisig / lightning wallet, like the derivation paths, scripts, etc. When using Muun, you will back up two pieces of data: the Recovery Code and ...


4

https://bitcoin.org/en/bitcoin-core/ says For the latest developments related to Bitcoin Core, be sure to visit the project’s official website. (which is a link to https://bitcoincore.org/) So there has been a deliberate separation between the Bitcoin.org project and the Bitcoin core project. This would make sense as Bitcoin.org provide information and ...


4

A HD wallet doesn’t know what indexes of a seed to scan for until the ones prior have been used, which can’t be discovered out of order. To allow for out of order scanning the address gap limit would need to be prohibitively large, and might still result in re-scanning filters if the wallet is particularly active.


4

Part of the design is that compromise of their service is a little bit pointless. They can not sign transactions spending your money to begin with, as the transactions also need a signature from your wallet too. There’s no scenario in which the service can spend your money without your participation to some degree. In unlikely scenario the service attempts ...


3

You can import a descriptor composed of the xpriv(s) (or xpub(s) if you just want to watch the coins) to the bitcoind wallet, and then rescan the block chain for transactions involving derived key up to a configured gap limit. For importing the descriptor, use the importmulti RPC call in versions <0.21 and the importdescriptors RPC as of 0.21 (upcoming). ...


2

You can use it. Electrum, nowadays, is as popular as Multibit used to be, so you can assume that you will always be able to recover your coins. To be safer, you can export the private keys from Electrum and save them in an encrypted archive such as ZIP or 7zip. (But you need to do this every time you make a transaction) What I would actually do would be to ...


2

Google Cloud provides a dataset for most public blockchains, including bitcoin. You can directly query the dataset via their BigQuery Tool - you can use standard SQL Bitcoin Dataset on GCP: https://console.cloud.google.com/marketplace/product/bitcoin/crypto-bitcoin?filter=solution-type:dataset&id=7fd60425-cb95-4a58-b59f-ab3789642844


2

How do internet wallets such as Coinbase connect to the a blockchain node? Using an API provided for that purpose. For example Bitcoin core's API Doesn’t the node itself create a default wallet object on startup? Not all nodes are based on Bitcoin core. Apart from the development costs there is nothing that prevents exchanges writing their own software to ...


2

https://bitcoincore.org is the official website of the Bitcoin Core project while https://bitcoin.org is a separate website and project which aims to provide general information about Bitcoin. The reason that bitcoin.org still has a section dedicated to Bitcoin Core and provides downloads for Bitcoin Core is because it is the website where the Bitcoin client ...


2

"Bitcoin Wallet" wallet on Blockchain.com is a "non-custodial" wallet -- this is probably what you want, and it'll let you send and receive Bitcoin to and from a wallet with a key that you own. You can import this key into other wallet software if you ever need to. "Bitcoin Trading" wallet on Blockchain.com is a "custodial&...


1

I think the least "intense" option here would be to look up each of the wallet addresses from your ckey items on a node (i.e. blockchain.info blockchair.com btc.com etc) to see which ones have any value in them. Once you have a list of the wallet addresses that are "worth recovering," you will need to take those ckey items' encrypted ...


1

Most wallets today are not merely a set of key pairs as they were originally stored in wallet.dat, but the keys are deterministically generated from a common root. The generating process is described technically in BIP-32 (Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets). Using a fixed entropy, a master key is generated using a key derivation function, and from this, a ...


1

I hope I'm missing something, and that somebody can enlighten me. As I expect you know, information-security can be described as a combination of confidentiality, integrity and availability. You seem to be concentrating on availability, I believe the makers of hardware wallets are prioritising confidentiality. If you have a hardware wallet, you are likely ...


1

First dump your keys using the instructions here Then open a new Electrum wallet, ask it to "Import private keys", and paste your private keys there. Then you will be able to spend from there if you have coins.


1

All those addresses have the same structure (a public key hash) and are used the same way. The difference is, bc1 addresses keep transaction signatures in a separate place in the blockchain than 1 addresses. That is, there's a fee discount when you spend from bc1 addresses. Without any doubts, the newer bc1 addresses are superior. The reason 1 addresses are ...


1

You can avoid risking exposing your private keys and just check the addresses with scanutxooutset in the console or via JSON-RPC. Although it takes a few minutes, you don't have to wait for a full rescan and it's easy to get all UTXOs for any address or even xpub and it doesn't have to already be in your wallet like when importing keys. Example in the ...


1

This python library comes close (disclaimer: I wrote it). It supports HD wallets via mnemonic or xprv and you can query outputs of addresses however it queries a block explorer for the outputs instead of bitcoind (you can probably tweak the code to replace the API call with an rpc call)


1

In short, it knows because it knows. Whatever information was used to make the original wallet construct the addresses (whether that consists of a seed, a set of keys, a master key, a descriptor, a mnemonic phrase, ...) must be imported into the new wallet too. The P2SH redeemscript is not created randomly: there is a procedure to generate it from keys the ...


1

I'd suggest you to: Look into hosting your own bitcoin node. Try using P2P non-custodial non-kyc exchange, you can find the list here. You may want not to store your wallet on a hard drive. The suggested solution is to own a hardware wallet


1

What is the safest way to generate bitcoin wallet? From the existing software such as bitcoin-core? electrum? Ensure you are using open source hardware and nothing is backdoored. I am not an expert but Luke Dashjr might help you with this considering some interesting tweets in past. Ensure there are no malwares on system you use for bitcoin wallet. You can ...


1

This definitely sounds like a scam. I am new to bitcoin and someone (the account manager) call me to buy and i made it last week Bitcoin does not have 'account managers'. There is a well-known scam though, where the scammer will message/contact you pretending to be an investor/manager/miner/etc, offering amazing returns on your investment in BTC. If ...


1

What I would do in this case (the easiest approach): Copy wallet.dat to a new directory called Bitcoin in %appdata% Run latest Bitcoin core Open the console and do dumpwallet C:\Users\yourusername\Desktop\wallet.txt Quit Core and delete your new Bitcoin directory. (Don't forget to delete it, it might become larger than 100 MB, to save space) Import wallet ...


1

About your new diagram: https://imgur.com/a/RaRgWEb Firstly "execute mining software" implies that you have maybe at least 1% of the network hash and solo mining. Otherwise, the process is just: Use the stratum protocol to receive the block template and the difficulty target Attempt hashes until the block is valid in hardware. Then every node ...


1

To fix this on Windows I had to specify the full path to a folder, and it could not be inside Program Files. This full path worked C:\Users\me\Desktop\temp\test


1

Withdrawals fees are individual per specific exchange and in many cases they don't relate to the current bitcoin feerate. So you'd have to check your Coinbase and Binance exchange account, in the withdrawal section to see how much fees are they taking for withdrawal.


1

How can I proceed to put all in one wallet together? Decide which wallet you want the coins to end up in Open that wallet, copy a receiving address from it Open the other wallet, send all funds from it to the address you copied above (be sure to double check that the address you paste matches!) Wait for transaction confirmation. Once confirmed, all your ...


1

You can use Specter Desktop with the Bitcoin Core wallet and a hardware wallet for the first key and second key respectively in a 2-of-2 multisig. For a disclaimer it states on the Specter README: This software might be ready to be used but at your own risk. Alternatives Michael Flaxman also discussed briefly on the Stephan Livera podcast are Caravan (...


1

If you had saved "backup" of your wallet in a file with name similar to bitcoin-wallet-backup-YYYY-MM-DD-hh-mm, it can be restored from SAFETY -> RESTORE WALLET on top-right in the app assuming you also remember the associated password for backup file.


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