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Let's suppose I have lost everything except this extended master key. How can I setup a new fresh computer and retrieve all my bitcoins just with this key? According to How to get xpub or mpk(bip32) for my bitcoin core wallet? you can export the xpriv with dumpwallet According to https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=3866008.0 Bitcoin Core does ...


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This is the private key that allows you to spend Bitcoin which is sent to the corresponding address. If you run both of those commands twice, you will generate a new key pair and a new address each time, which will be different.


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Welcome to the Bitcoin world. My first question is: When and How my private/public key was generated? Your public key is calculated by your private key. Where your private key is a randomly chosen number, so let's suppose that now we choose k value as your private key, from this we can apply a unidirectional cryptographic function, ie from the private ...


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Entropy-to-Mnemonic The process for a BIP39-compliant 12-word mnemonic, for example, is that first a random binary number 128 bits long is (ideally) generated with a cryptographically-secure process, then a deterministic checksum is computed by taking the first 4-bits of a SHA256 hash digest of the 128 bits formatted as a byte-array. Then we have 132 bits ...


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I am sorry to hear about your loss and situation. I would suggest the following industry-known expert Pamela Morgan (She is the partner of Bitcoin advocate Andreas Antonopoulos) on the matter of estate-related crypto planning and backups, and who could potentially help guide you in the recovery process (here is her official Twitter and Website for reference)....


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This feels like a really complex task to be done over forums. Do you happen to have someone you trust who's good with computers? My advice would be finding someone trustworthy to help you IRL. Nevertheless, if I'm understanding correctly your goal is to sell these tokens for USD? For that you'll need to send your coins to an exchange (you mention Coinbase ...


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If you were getting transaction notifications to your email address, you might be able to find something in your mail account. Other than that, an address alone does not provide any indication which service or software might have generated it.


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Perhaps you're confused by the phrasing "the wallet", as it's only the receiver's wallet who needs to know the public key, and he has it, because he created the address in the first place. In what follows, I'm going to assume a standard 1... address (pay to pubkey hash). That's not the only type of address, but similar ressonings apply to every type of ...


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I was under the impression that addresses are just a encoded Yes, addresses are encoded (base58 or base32) to help human readability. They include a checksum to ensure protection against errors in address transcription and entry. A bitcoin address can represent the owner of a private/ public key pair, or it can represent any other script that can be ...


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There are different kinds of ouputs a transaction can pay to. For simplicity I'll explain it with a Pay-to-PubkeyHash (P2PKH) output as an example. I think this is what your question is based on. With a P2PKH output you are right. An address is just an encoded and hashed public key with a prefix. You can remove the prefix and reverse the encoding, but you ...


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The only true way to defend against this is to avoid large balances with each private key. But if people do that then it will be much easier to find something if adoption happens and active addresses continued to double every 5 years. Assuming btc is eventually $ 2 million per bitcoin and average person saves say 200k in bitcoin. They would need 2000 ...


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The security in bits of a 12-word mnemonic that has a valid checksum as per BIP39 is not 132 bits, but rather 128 bits, as the last 4 bits are determined based on the first 128 bits - the initial "entropy". Even though the range of 2^132 of all possible mnemonics is 16 times larger than 2^128 (where (2^128)*16 = 2^132), the checksum cannot be predicted ...


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Main answer to your main question in title: The string of words, known as the crypto wallet "recovery phrase", or "mnemonic words" or "seed words" are simply a human-readable format of the underlying machine-readable entropy - which is a large random number - used to create the crypto vault. answer to your second and third question: The exact steps from ...


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I've asked myself similar questions which lead to learning more about mnemonics with Bitcoin, and like many other (not all) cryptocurrencies, which use BIP39 which is a specification based on a unique wordlist of 2048 words (zero-indexed from 0-2047) available in various languages (although I should note that you cannot translate words across supported ...


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Is it possible to convert back and forth between say, for instance, a 24-word phrase to a 12-word phrase, and what tools can I use to make the conversion? No, that is not possible. The mnemonic words represent an entropy, for example the 24 word mnemonic phrase represents 256 bits of entropy while a 12 word mnemonic represents 128 bits of entropy. These ...


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I imagine the Bitcoin-core source code may be a good guide to the layout of a wallet.dat file. You may need to find the source of the specific version of Bitcoin core that created (or last wrote) the wallet.dat file. There is also https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Wallet which points you to various resources. The format of this file is Berkeley DB. Tools that ...


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First of all at this stage all lightning network nodes implementations are hot wallets. There are people / teams working on hardware wallets in lightning. Also I don't get your base assumption why you would trust casa which I believe is not open source more than trusting btc pay server which I believe is open source. The only reason I see is that you ...


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If you are using more than one wallet, the wallet is selected by sending the RPC requests to <host:port>/wallet/<wallet_name>.


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