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I'm quite new to this business, and I have a question.

Here I have 12 words and a passphrase, there is a Wasabi Wallet application on the computer and created a wallet based on this data.

Can I use the same 12 words and passphrase to restore my Android wallet using Samurai Wallet?

When I try to enter the same data as in Wasabi Wallet, I have a different wallet (I compare the private keys and they do not match).

Can someone explain to me what I'm doing wrong? I want to have the same wallet on all platforms, knowing only 12 phrases and a passphrase.

Thank you in advance for your answers, I will be glad to everyone.

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  • Can you share the steps you performed for checking private keys in Samourai Wallet? – Prayank Jan 9 at 1:48
  • I enter 12 phrases, enter the BIP39 password, click restore, compare keys and see discrepancies. – malordin Jan 9 at 9:38
  • Which keys (not asking to share keys) do you compare and where do you compare? – Prayank Jan 9 at 10:51
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A single mnemonic seed phrase can be used to derive many different addresses, either via different derivation paths, different address types, etc.

It may often be possible to create multiple instances of the same wallet using different software, but the two wallet applications you've mentioned have nuanced operation and likely use different derivation schemes for certain wallet functions (eg mixed output change, etc). I doubt that there is the option to have them derive all of the same addresses. Perhaps it is possible via advanced settings, but at the least I hope my answer can help to highlight the nature of the situation.

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First, a word of caution: unlike how it's advertised, Samourai is not a privacy wallet, so be prepared to give up your privacy, which defeats the point of using Wasabi. Samourai sends your xpub - which is your past, present and future financial history - to their servers, which retroactively deanonymizes the coinjoins you did with Wasabi in the past.

Assuming you don't care about privacy and you succeed, there'll still be a host of wallet balance issues on both sides of the coin. The red wallet doesn't index deep enough keys and the green wallet is bech32 only, which means if you spend with Samourai, the changes often aren't bech32 outputs, so they won't always appear in Wasabi.

If you still would like to proceed, then it should be possible as both wallet uses the same key derivation strategy. I also did the other way around (samuri -> wasabi) a few years ago and apparently this guy too :) I can think of 2 things you are doing wrong here:

  • you're trying testnet: Wasabi uses mainnet paths for testnet wallets.
  • you're not aware of the BIP39 passphrase: in Wasabi your chosen wallet password is also used as the 13th mnemonic word.

If this doesn't help and you'd like to continue hacking around, you may read this great guide on restoring wasabi in electrum, which isn't the same that you're asking, but close enough and points out to many pitfalls.

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  • samurai wallet is just an example. I want to understand exactly how to use my 12 phrases and a passphrase for ALL wallets. That is, in my case, I want to use my phrases and passphrase to restore the wallet on the PC and on Android. So that my balance is displayed both there and there. – malordin Jan 9 at 9:36
  • In response to your assumptions. No, I use the main network in wassabi. 13 phrase I know, because I have no goal to hack anything, I'm still trying to understand at least the basic things about storing your bitcoins. – malordin Jan 9 at 9:37
  • This inherent privacy flaw does not only apply to samuri, but to every Bitcoin wallet with the exception of full nodes, Wasabi Wallet and some PoC code. The only difference with samuri is that they market themselves as a privacy centric. You may be interested in learning more about Network Level Privacy. – nopara73 Jan 10 at 23:14

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