14

An accepted share represents work that your miner did towards a round in a mining pool. When the pool finds a block, it distributes the block reward (i.e. 25BTC) to the miners according to how many shares they have contributed during that round. The more shares you contributed, the more payback you get. It is simply a way to keep score, and to attribute ...


12

What do the mining workers do differently then if they would be mining solo? A miner that is mining within a third-party pool doesn't need the entire block chain. In fact it doesn't need to be connected to any peers of the Bitcoin network. These miners work entirely outside of the network and could technically just need to communicate to the administrator ...


6

My guess is that you did not launch cgminer with the --scrypt option. This is required to mine Litecoin, Dogecoin or any other scrypt coin. When mining scrypt coins that card should deliver ~100 Kh/s in your screen shot it shows Mh/s which would indicate that you are using SHA256 which is for Bitcoin.


6

The higher difficulty means you will be reporting results less frequently to the pool. This reduces network load on both your system and the pool. It also reduces the restart delay for your mining hardware as it prepares for the next work unit. Most pools base the rewards on the number of difficulty 2 shares accepted. So they increase the reward based on ...


6

Contrary to popular belief, mining is not something where there is progress. Each hash has the same probability of being a valid block hash. You could get lucky and find a valid hash with your next hash, or you could not. There is no progress that is made. When you mine on a lower difficulty, the target that your hash must be under is much higher than that ...


5

The address the block reward goes to is in the data that is being hashed. That address is the pool's. If a miner finds a hash that meets the block difficulty, changing the address to the miner's own will cause a different hash, and you don't have control over the distribution of the bits in that second hash. So you don't get a block if you change the address....


5

The work given by a pool includes the coinbase transaction which defines the payment as going to the pool, and is unique to that. If the client modifies the payout address, the proof of work they have done is invalidated. They can not steal money from the pool by doing this.


4

The mining pool coordinates the workers. Think of it like a lottery. If you and your friends all buy tickets in the lottery the group has a better chance of winning. To be fair in the lottery example everyone should be rewarded proportional to the amount of money spent on tickets. So if there are 20 tickets for the pool one person purchased 10 and two people ...


3

Dead On Arrival. The term is referring to about valid shares your miner discovers that were found too late to be included in the P2Pool internal block chain and therefor aren't paid to the miner. Counter intuitively a DOA share can still be a valid Bitcoin block.


3

There really isn't one when you are pool mining. Most pools these days use VarDiff to achieve the same number of shares per minute by changing your workers difficulty. Now, on a low end mining rig (lets say 20 kh/s) the number of shares accepted may vary greatly as you may have some great luck with your share or it may be bad luck. So as long as you have a "...


3

Your shares are towards a block, once a block is completed you start on a new block and go back to 0 shares. Depending on your pool, you get paid per block or per share. Don't worry, if you look on your pools website you should be able to find what you made off of the block and how many shares you contributed. Restarting GUIMiner will not remove your shares,...


3

The amount of data required for a standard rig isn't very high. There are a few things that I would suggest if you are having issues. Don't use wifi if possible. Connect your rig directly to your network with an ethernet cable. Connect to the closest mining pool. Ping different pools and use the closest one. The lower the time the better. Make sure your ...


3

You are mining, but most pools today have a minimum share difficulty requirement, otherwise very fast miners bombard them with shares that they have to process and discard. For many pools this is at a minimum of 128 or higher, meaning it would take several days for a CPU miner to find a share on average. No pool has a payout of any less than 0.00001 BTC, so ...


2

You won't see a value there until you mine a share, so seeing a ??? is normal for the moment. The efficiency is a measure of how many shares have been counted in the share chain verses the ones you have found. At 2GH/s you should be expecting to see a share soon, given an average of 2 days 8 hours to find a share at 2GH/s at difficulty 88800 (the current ...


2

hashes = shares * share_difficulty * 2**48 / 65535 thus: megahash_per_second = shares_per_second * share_difficulty * 4295.032833


2

The share difficulty submitted will not theoretically make you mine faster or slower although you will see higher variability in displayed hash-rate (since it's calculated based on diff1 shares submitted) with higher difficulty shares. The payout should* be the same over time if you mine at 16 difficulty or 1024 with that card. Diff1 share just means one ...


2

The pool might be adjusting your share difficulty level. For example, you might be mining at 50 KH/s and the pool is setting your share difficulty at 16. If you then increase your hashrate to 100 KH/s and the pool changes your share difficulty to 64, then you will submit shares half as fast, but receive four times as much credit for a share at difficulty 64 ...


2

When your share is better than the difficulty you have solved a block. Other than that, the best share is only for your information/amusement. Although, some pools only count shares above a certain difficulty towards the work one has provided. Even succeeding at the difficulty, you could still not be discovering a block for one of the following reasons: ...


2

If I understand multi-PPS correctly, it's really simple. How does multi-PPS work: Miner Alice registers with Bob's pool: she gives Bob one of her addresses (to use for payouts) and Bob gives her one of his addresses (to use in coinbase transactions). Bob will give Alice credit for mining shares which pay that coinbase address, and at defined intervals or ...


2

It's hardware specific, and most of the information for Bitcoin mining ASIC are under an NDA so this can't be posted publicly. There's very little utility in returning difficulty one shares to the controller, for a device doing 1TH/s it would mean dealing with hundreds of results a second that the controller is just throwing away. The difficulty of a "...


2

I think that it shows "booooo" when a share is rejected, and "yay!!!" when a share is accepted. In x/y (z%) x is the number of accepted shares y is the number of total shares submitted (accepted+rejected) z is x/y as a percentage (the percent that are accepted) Why do I see a 'Yay' with a 70% match, and a 'Booo' with a 75% match? Because you had a ...


2

The value of a difficulty one share is roughly the block reward divided by the difficulty. Right now, the block reward is 25 and the difficulty is 11,756,551,916. So 10,000 shares (assuming they're difficulty one Bitcoin shares) is worth about 0.000021 BTC.


2

Not that I'm aware of, in terms of dealing with traditional publicly-facing companies on the exchanges you mention. There were a number of attempts to create new, bitcoin-only exchanges for privately held companies, but few have gotten much traction. This reddit comment goes into great detail about the history of private stock exchanges in bitcoin, which ...


2

As others have said schemes differ. But to try to answer the question you asked: Are all the shares submitted between blocks found counted? ie. If a pool finds a block every 10 blocks, do the shares from the other 9 get added together and the entire block reward split across all work done on the found and previously unsuccessful blocks based on the share ...


2

From what I understand basically if the entire blockchain requires a very high hash rate (for example result should end with 100 zeros) in pool mining your shares will be based on the number of times you are able to solve a simpler problem requiring a medium hash rate (should end with 50 zeros). So you are still solving the same problem but attempts where ...


2

pdiff, the pool difficulty, is not just a different encoding of the same difficulty. Pools set a different (lower) difficulty so that miners can send them more blocks as shares, and calculate how much work they're doing. Valid blocks are still checked against the normal bdiff before submission to the network


2

First of all, Bitcoin does not actually use the number of zeroes for the difficulty. Rather it interprets the hash as a number and checks that the block hash is less than or equal to a particular target. This makes the hash have several leading zeroes, but those zeroes are not being considered directly. The target for a share varies by pool, and usually, by ...


2

So, how does mining pool know, if we have actually gone through all the 1000 mega hashes to submit one share to the mining pool (Person A has done more work than person B)? The mining pool don't know and don't care how many attempts your miner made to solve a share, he care about how many shares you actually solve. (person A and person B get the same ...


1

First of all, please be careful with using the terminology "network difficulty." Network difficulty is the difficulty at which a hash is accepted by the network (as opposed to the pool). Technically speaking, if d is the network difficulty, then your probability of finding a valid hash is 1/(d*2^32). If your question is interpreted literally, then the answer ...


1

I'll back up his (BTW, I hope you know that mining any SHA256 coin on a CPU is almost certain to cost you more than it can earn you) I'm mining it with a usb gekkoscience asic at 23,000,000,000 23gigahash, and getting 4 1 cent an hour.. the only reason I'm actualy earning anything is I'm only going through 2.5 watts of power... your probably going ...


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