12

The way you describe it it's not possible. The pool sends you the template of the block that you ought to be working on. Should you really find a block it is bound to the block template you received from the pool, i.e., the nonce that satisfies the proof-of-work difficulty is only valid because it is valid in combination with the template. Since the block ...


12

Bitcoin miners find a random number (called a "Nonce") that when inserted into the current block makes the hash be below the current target. They then send that current block around the network and everyone checks their work (the proof-of-work) by hashing the block and checking if the result is below the current target. In mining pools, miners do the same ...


11

What do the mining workers do differently then if they would be mining solo? A miner that is mining within a third-party pool doesn't need the entire block chain. In fact it doesn't need to be connected to any peers of the Bitcoin network. These miners work entirely outside of the network and could technically just need to communicate to the administrator ...


10

An accepted share represents work that your miner did towards a round in a mining pool. When the pool finds a block, it distributes the block reward (i.e. 25BTC) to the miners according to how many shares they have contributed during that round. The more shares you contributed, the more payback you get. It is simply a way to keep score, and to attribute ...


8

To understand this we should first explain that a block with a high difficulty, let's say D, is also a share of low difficulty d < D, therefore if we find such a block for difficulty D we automatically have a block of difficulty d. This also means that if I as a miner am looking for a share with difficulty d I might by chance find a block of difficulty D (...


6

If the global network difficulty is D and the difficulty of shares in the pool is d, then the probability that a share will lead to a valid block is d/D. The reward in this case is B, so the average reward per share is B*(d/D). If the operator's average fee is f (so for example f=0.01 means 1% fee), the average reward miners get per share submitted is (1-f) *...


6

The hashes generated by your miner is only usable for a unique set of transactions that your pool decided to include. In addition each pool orders transactions differently and that too will affect the resulting hash. Unless the pools cooperate and synchronize all the details of a given block (nonce, merkle tree, etc) then any hash that is generated is ...


6

My guess is that you did not launch cgminer with the --scrypt option. This is required to mine Litecoin, Dogecoin or any other scrypt coin. When mining scrypt coins that card should deliver ~100 Kh/s in your screen shot it shows Mh/s which would indicate that you are using SHA256 which is for Bitcoin.


6

The higher difficulty means you will be reporting results less frequently to the pool. This reduces network load on both your system and the pool. It also reduces the restart delay for your mining hardware as it prepares for the next work unit. Most pools base the rewards on the number of difficulty 2 shares accepted. So they increase the reward based on ...


6

Contrary to popular belief, mining is not something where there is progress. Each hash has the same probability of being a valid block hash. You could get lucky and find a valid hash with your next hash, or you could not. There is no progress that is made. When you mine on a lower difficulty, the target that your hash must be under is much higher than that ...


5

Blocks which only satisfy the requirement for a lower difficulty than the real network difficulty are called "shares". They are found naturally in the process of looking for valid blocks, and there is no way to find shares without doing the work needed to find blocks. Thus, shares prove that work has been done by the miner. Pools use these shares to ...


5

You should count each share as valuable as the difficulty of the pre-determined target for that miner. If you count the actual value of the hash it found itself, either the math won't work, or you'll introduce massive variance instead of reducing it (which a pool is intended to do). When you choose a particular share difficulty D, you are restricting the ...


5

In order to find a Block, one needs to perform A LOT of tries - about 2^32 * the current difficulty. That number is so huge that solo miners rarely would be able to solve a block. A share on the other hand is a block of difficulty 1, which is at the moment a few million times easier to find. Finding a share does not help in finding a block in any way - each ...


4

Due to the very low probability of successful generation, this makes it unpredictable which worker computer in the network will be able to generate the next block. http://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Proof_of_work This is what makes proof-of-work based cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin different from any other form of electronic money. With access to mining being ...


4

It should pay 100USD for every 713 shares (diff as I type). That refers to shares of a certain difficulty: diff 1 Litecoin shares or diff 65,536 shares according to some mining clients (notably CGMiner). Each found share has its difficulty. If the share's difficulty is equal to or higher than the worker's difficulty, it gets submitted by the worker and ...


4

The mining pool coordinates the workers. Think of it like a lottery. If you and your friends all buy tickets in the lottery the group has a better chance of winning. To be fair in the lottery example everyone should be rewarded proportional to the amount of money spent on tickets. So if there are 20 tickets for the pool one person purchased 10 and two people ...


4

The address the block reward goes to is in the data that is being hashed. That address is the pool's. If a miner finds a hash that meets the block difficulty, changing the address to the miner's own will cause a different hash, and you don't have control over the distribution of the bits in that second hash. So you don't get a block if you change the address....


3

Your shares are towards a block, once a block is completed you start on a new block and go back to 0 shares. Depending on your pool, you get paid per block or per share. Don't worry, if you look on your pools website you should be able to find what you made off of the block and how many shares you contributed. Restarting GUIMiner will not remove your shares,...


3

hashesPerSecond = math.pow(2, 32) * proofsOfWork / secondsElapsed where proofsOfWork is the number of difficulty 1 proofs of work (aka shares) that the user or pool has found during secondsElapsed seconds. If you use variable difficulty, then you can count a proof of work from someone mining at difficulty X the same as X proofs of work at difficulty 1. ...


3

There really isn't one when you are pool mining. Most pools these days use VarDiff to achieve the same number of shares per minute by changing your workers difficulty. Now, on a low end mining rig (lets say 20 kh/s) the number of shares accepted may vary greatly as you may have some great luck with your share or it may be bad luck. So as long as you have a "...


3

Dead On Arrival. The term is referring to about valid shares your miner discovers that were found too late to be included in the P2Pool internal block chain and therefor aren't paid to the miner. Counter intuitively a DOA share can still be a valid Bitcoin block.


3

You are mining, but most pools today have a minimum share difficulty requirement, otherwise very fast miners bombard them with shares that they have to process and discard. For many pools this is at a minimum of 128 or higher, meaning it would take several days for a CPU miner to find a share on average. No pool has a payout of any less than 0.00001 BTC, so ...


2

When mining in a pool you are simply looking for simpler blocks than those that are used in the network itself. Let's say you are mining in a pool that counts difficulty 1 shares. That means to find share you have to complete 2^32 hash operations. Since difficulty is defined as the ratio between the current target and the maximum (as in easiest) target, each ...


2

Variable difficulty mining: If you are mining at a pool with a higher difficulty, then each share (proof-of-work) is worth more on average. Proving that you worked very hard is worth more than proving that you worked a little bit. Some pools now use variable difficulty, which means the difficulty can change over time. One share at difficulty X has the same ...


2

Stale shares have no chance of being a valid block credited to the pool, thus submitting one contributes nothing to the pool. The default behavior, then, should be not to pay for invalid shares. (A comparison with matching the difficulty target is illustrative. A miner has no influence on how many of his shares match the target, and hence it is fair to be ...


2

The server will reject all shares that are below the difficulty it specified in your getwork request. Reasons for the server to lower the difficulty of accepted shares: Less variance for users Reasons for the server to raise the difficulty of accepted shares: Lowers bandwidth usage Something from 4 to 10000 is about right.


2

You won't see a value there until you mine a share, so seeing a ??? is normal for the moment. The efficiency is a measure of how many shares have been counted in the share chain verses the ones you have found. At 2GH/s you should be expecting to see a share soon, given an average of 2 days 8 hours to find a share at 2GH/s at difficulty 88800 (the current ...


2

hashes = shares * share_difficulty * 2**48 / 65535 thus: megahash_per_second = shares_per_second * share_difficulty * 4295.032833


2

The Utility defined as the number of shares / minute Its the number of shares your miner is contributing per minute. If you're looking at the overall Utility values, its the combined number of shares all miners are contributing per minute. Reference: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=28402.0


2

The share difficulty submitted will not theoretically make you mine faster or slower although you will see higher variability in displayed hash-rate (since it's calculated based on diff1 shares submitted) with higher difficulty shares. The payout should* be the same over time if you mine at 16 difficulty or 1024 with that card. Diff1 share just means one ...


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