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Is there a specific attack or bug which asymmetric cryptography prevents during bitcoin transactions? asymmetric cryptography is not really something that was added on top of Bitcoin in order to prevent some specific attack or fix some specific bug. asymmetric cryptography is one of two fundamental foundation stones, one of the two primary building blocks ...


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Without asymetric cryptography, there wouldn't be information asymmetry: in other words, everyone knows exactly as much as everyone else. If everyone knows equally much, there is no way to distinguish a legitimate sender from a malicious one. More specifically, if a symmetric construction like an HMAC was used to authenticate a transaction, miners would ...


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No that is not possible as it will require reverse engineering the HMAC-SHA512 function or finding a double collision that will generate the same keys. The xpub key is an encoded form of the extended key which is basically the concatenation of the public key and chain code at the account level. You include this extended key along with an index number (0 for ...


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This is not only related to Lightning but remains true for any critical application that you run on your PC when connected to your home network. If your home network is compromised then an attacker can possibly escalate privileges and compromise the machine on which your lightning node is running (as well as other critical applications). Lightning is thought ...


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Bitcoin transaction works on low-level primitive constructs of scripting languages and cryptography. In simple terms, you lock your funds to an equation and anyone who can provide a solution to that equation can spend the money. So there are no account level data, just unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs). Every time you need to spend your bitcoins, you just ...


1

since the group is cyclic with order N, then this key will be equal to 0x14551231950b75fc4402da1732fc9bebd (your key modulo N) >>> hex(N) '0xfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffebaaedce6af48a03bbfd25e8cd0364141' >>> y=0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE >>> multiply(y) (...


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