A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
6

When you sign the transaction with your private key, you include the hash of the entire transaction data as a message. This means the signature which is generated is specific to that transaction itself and any modification to the transaction will render the signature invalid. In this case, the user who has signed the transaction has already specified the ...


2

You don't need to grant someone access to the entire machine to be able to use bitcoin-cli. You can provision credentials using the rpcauth parameter in bitcoin.conf (it may be defined multiple times for multiple username/password combinations), and whitelist their IP address for the port you are running the bitcoin RPC on. They can then use a local bitcoin-...


1

No. Secure elements are designed to be resistant to physical attacks. So you shouldn't be able to do anything physical to the chip that allows you to get data off of it. They are designed to prevent unauthorized access to their data so they also are more than just storage devices. While you can desolder the chip and attach wires to its pins in order to ...


1

To elaborate on this part of Ugam Kamat's excellent answer: "When you sign the transaction with your private key, you include the hash of the entire transaction data as a message." The function that turns the transaction into a hash to be signed is not just any hash function; in the code it's called a "sighash" or "signature hash". Each signature contains ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible