7

Like Murch said, there isn't a current text based symbol for it, but if you're going to use it on a web application, you can always use Font Awesome. After you include the fontawesome library, you use the bitcoin symbol like this: <i class="fa fa-btc"></i> fa-btc Example output of the code above would be: You can find more information ...


5

Recently I stumbled across this question as I was supposed to explain what Bitcoin was to my 5-year-old nephew. As the question states that it needs to explain the concept of bitcoin to a non-technical person, I took it a step further and explained it to the kid, who knows nothing (literally). So here goes my 2 satoshis on what is the best explanation (...


4

If you create a raw transaction yourself, then that is the raw transaction. Whatever you put in it is exactly what the transaction will be, in the same order. There are some conventions around output ordering. Some software will randomly permute the outputs; other software uses BIP69 which specifies a deterministic ordering. There is however no requirement ...


4

I got the common Bitcoin symbol (B with two lines) approved for addition to Unicode as U+20BF last year. It will hopefully become part of the next Unicode standard in June and then it can be used in text. The character (₿) is already supported by iOS and macOS.


4

This is the PR that made OP_RETURN outputs standard: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/2738 The commit: https://github.com/jgarzik/bitcoin/commit/a79342479f577013f2fd2573fb32585d6f4981b3 The current code: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/v0.11.0/src/script/standard.cpp#L56-L58 if (GetBoolArg("-datacarrier", true)) ...


3

The denial-of-service (DOS) attack is easy to explain: each time a transaction is updated by increasing the sequence number in an input, the whole transaction needs to be propagated through the network again. So if a transaction is 1 KB and there are 10,000 full nodes, you can waste a minimum of 10 MB of network bandwidth each time you update the ...


3

Bitcoin is a global payment network on the internet. It is self-sustained and allows users to make payments between individuals like cash. Instead of a company being the referee, Bitcoin is governed neutrally by rules asserted through a network of computers running the same open-source software. Bitcoin is completely transparent, in that anyone can see ...


3

For non-technical users, I found this video to be extremely clear and helpful in explaining the details of how Bitcoin works: How Bitcoin Works Under the Hood


2

Update in 2020: The Unicode 10.0 release included the Bitcoin symbol ₿ as U+20BF. For your computer to show the symbol in text, you may need to install a font that includes it. For Linux, one such font is GNU Unifont Glyphs. To my knowledge there doesn't yet exist a single symbol font representation of the B with two vertical lines, although it seems to be ...


2

Using bitcoind and bitcoin-cli you can do it as follows: bitcoin-cli signmessage 1DiWX6p3FdHPZqN88vMeGVXSwAQ1h7BeVj 'Hello world!'


2

I've made a custom font with Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Dogecoin symbols. There's a download link in .otf format in this bitcointalk thread. (It's labeled "Download.") If this font file doesn't include a cryptocurrency symbol that you need, I'm willing to add it.


2

I think you need something like this <a rel="payment" href="bitcoin:bitcoin_address_is_here?amount=5.00?message=payment to site name"><h2>Pay in Bitcoin now</h2></a>


2

There's a dedicated C-library for this curve. This is probably the most widely scrutinized library, and it probably has the best performance. Wrappers for other languages are available. https://github.com/bitcoin/secp256k1


2

To answer your question exactly: why were they made non-standard? Because originally (after a few vulnerabilities in the Script logic in 2010), all scripts were made non-standard except a few whitelisted ones. Since then, more and more groups of scripts have been added to that category (including almost all P2SH scripts, with a few exceptions). Why have bare ...


2

There is no limit on the per-input, per-output, fee, or total amount transacted, apart from the fact that all numbers need to be valid BTC amounts (which means not less than 0 and not more than 21M BTC).


1

By input script, if you mean scriptSig, the max standard scriptSig can be up to 1650 bytes. See policy.cpp : // Biggest 'standard' txin is a 15-of-15 P2SH multisig with compressed // keys (remember the 520 byte limit on redeemScript size). That works // out to a (15*(33+1))+3=513 byte redeemScript, 513+1+15*(73+1)+3=1627 // bytes of scriptSig, which we ...


1

Edit: Have a look at MSG_MERKLEBLOCK. Included information is: Block Header, Transaction Count, Hash Count, hashes, flag byte count, and flags. hashes include everything from the leaf to root, and flags gives the positions of the leaf in the Merkle tree. Since the index of the transaction gives it’s position from the left among the leaves in the Merkle ...


1

Here: bool Solver(const CScript& scriptPubKey, txnouttype& typeRet, vector<vector<unsigned char> >& vSolutionsRet) [...] // Empty, provably prunable, data-carrying output if (GetBoolArg("-datacarrier", true)) mTemplates.insert(make_pair(TX_NULL_DATA, CScript() << OP_RETURN << OP_SMALLDATA)); mTemplates....


1

Here is the unicode for '₿'. paste in any symbol you want the code for. Then hold CTRL+Shift & press 'u' followed by the code it gives. ₿ is 20bf.


1

In Bitcoin-qt Or you can do it in blockchain.info/wallet by clicking the menu above your addresses. No need to do it manually.


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