41

First, close the Bitcoin-Qt client. Then you have to locate your Bitcoin folder. For Windows, it should be here: %APPDATA%\Bitcoin and for Linux: ~/.bitcoin In that folder, there should be a wallet.dat file. If you currently have no bitcoins in your wallet, you can just delete that file and replace it with your backup. If you have some bitcoins in this ...


7

Response to clarified first part You're pretty close, I suspect you want something simpler like this (and then typing in the xprv you extracted from an Electrum 2.x (unencrypted) wallet file): bx hd-private --index 2 --hard | qrencode -o - | feh - In particular, don't include the bx hd-to-wif step, that's probably what's tripping you up. When you do the ...


6

According to this FAQ: In Electrum 2.0, you cannot import private keys in a wallet that has a seed. You should sweep them instead. If you want to import private keys and not sweep them you need to create a special wallet that does not have a seed. For this, create a new wallet, select “restore”, and instead of typing your seed, type a list of private keys, ...


5

the other answers suggest closing your node copying directories etc, NOT necessary. Here is how i did it starting with an old wallet2.dat file: create a folder foo (any name, any directory) copy the file wallet2.dat into folder foo and rename the wallet to wallet.dat on the GUI click Window->Console and type into the > field: help loadwallet which will tell ...


5

For OSX: Backup your original wallet.dat file (~/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/wallet.dat by default). This contains the private keys for your bitcoins. If you lose it, you lose your coins. Install Bitcoin Core on a machine with 100s of gigabytes of free space. Allow it to download the blockchain. This could take days. Replace the wallet.dat file on ...


5

This is an old question but just to say that the dumpwallet command has been added to bitcoin core. This will give you all the private keys in a text format.


5

Since I don't know what wallet app on Android you're using, I'll give an answer that should work for any: If you create an account at Coinbase, you can import your private keys and then send them to an address on your Android wallet. This requires the private keys being in plain text. If your private key export is encrypted (with a password you gave it) or ...


5

Start Bitcoin Core with the wallet.dat you want to export Dump your private keys via Bitcoin Core's Console using dumpwallet You'll get a list of private key to address pairs in the following format: L4ysibEFMBQc3hfr7tvUyV4nBP1YQ3AgDewszoYq5czMtXotmmro 2020-08-21T14:36:58Z change=1 #addr=bc1qpw40dkvcj23zt3efvdwqr7ddfunwktx11f3tjf Extract all private keys (...


5

OK found a way! Only cost me $8 to switch wallets! WTF? Go here and save the web page to disk: https://iancoleman.github.io/bip39/ Download, install, & start TOR browser. https://www.torproject.org/ We are using TOR because it is made for anonymity and privacy, and doesn't keep cookies, storage, cache, etc. We are going offline, but a Javascript page ...


4

If you export the private keys for the addresses you want to keep then you are literally your own bank, most wallets allow you to import private keys in some way. I don't know the specifics of doing it on Electrum though. To export from bitcoin-qt go into the debug console from the menus, and enter dumpprivkey "1bitcoinaddresshere" Keep that key safe - it ...


4

Do I have such a recovery seed? No. Bitcoin Core does not use mnemonics nor is the seed exportable. Is there any other way I can migrate my wallet to the trezor? (Other than creating a new wallet and transferring funds from the existing one to this new one) No. The only way to migrate is to send a transaction that transfers your Bitcoin to your Trezor. ...


3

MultiBit developer here. You'll need to use MultiBit Classic version 0.5.19 available as a download from the site https://multibit.org. This will allow you to open the .key file and synchronise with the block chain to recover all the funds associated with the private keys held in the file. Once you have imported the keys, we strongly recommend that you ...


3

I have to disagree with the other 2 answers at the time of this writing. While indeed wallet.dat contains all the critical information, and in theory you could just use it with another application, in practice the wallet file format is not consistent between applications, and AFAIK you cannot use that file elsewhere. Your best course of action depends on ...


3

"As I thought, it doesn't work that way. It wants a full directory with the databases, an alone wallet.dat is not enough. – Lohoris yesterday" Not at all... Wallet.dat is the only file that pywallet reads If you notice a bug, it's rather nice to report it to the dev instead of bashing him Same thing for new flags you might want: ask for them instead of ...


3

Is this even possible? Yes. In General You can move wallet contents from almost any Bitcoin wallet software to any other Bitcoin wallet software that supports the same standards. For example, if the first wallet supports Bech32, you will need the second wallet to also support Bech32. There are only a couple of small pieces of data that need to be copied ...


2

Just export the private key of one wallet and import to the other.


2

This question is already answered in the Electrum tutorials http://electrum.org/tutorials.html#switching-to-electrum What to do with my old addresses and wallet when switching to Electrum? The best way to switch to Electrum is to send all the bitcoins you have on your old wallet to one of the addresses on your Electrum wallet. This way you'll have all your ...


2

If you want to move Bitcoins in the sense of a wallet command it would require some more technical integration. However, the easiest thing is to scan the QR-code of your Android mobile wallet with your webcam. I use QuickMark for the scanning. Then you can simply copy paste the Bitcoin address to your desktop wallet and send Bitcoins to your phone via the ...


2

Incoming payments will show up in both wallets. If you spend any of the balance, the other wallet may show a 0 balance because the "change" will only go to the wallet you sent from. The other wallet won't know about the new "change" address. The safest thing to do is to transfer all the funds to a new address.


2

The backup file produced by the Android Bitcoin app is a text file containing lines of the form 5Jhvcnoi9LFxEcg68gTaDB3DiKEJ6TWJuMmyfjv89uEv3AbgdV 2013-01-01T12:34:56Z The first field is the private key. This can be imported into bitcoin-qt using the importprivkey command. Choose "Help > Debug window", go to the "Console" tab, and enter: importprivkey ...


2

There is (yet) no multi wallet support in bitcoin-core. You can try to stop Bitcoin-Qt, replace your wallet.dat (rename the old one, place the new one) and start Bitcoin-Qt. If your wallet is really old, it will perform a rescan for new transactions and this can take some minutes. To merge your wallets: Open Console and enter dumpwallet <filename> ...


2

All your addresses and private keys in MultiBit HD are produced from the wallet words that you are given when you create a wallet. (This is why it is so important to write your wallet words down). Because everything is generated from one thing the randomly generated private keys in MultiBit Classic cannot be imported into MultiBit HD. The safest way to ...


2

Unfortunately the electrum seed is not compatible with BIP32/BIP44, which is essentially what Coinomi implements, so the answer to your question is no, you cannot import your electrum seed into coinomi at the moment, although this might be possible in the future.


2

Unless you plan on doing ECC math and hashing algorithms by hand (it would take you about a day just to do a single round of SHA256) and publishing the raw binary transaction via raw network protocol, you're going to need some software. I would recommend getting Mycelium, which has a paper wallet import feature. You can then spend it where you like using ...


2

If you are using release binaries, yes. You must make sure to shut down Bitcoin Core cleanly before moving the file over, though. If you're using self-compiled versions, this is only possible if both versions are compiled against the same BDB library.


2

After lots of suffering I managed to do it. Very unfortunately mycelium does not even support importing their old keys. Fortunately they provide a backuputil which converts the private key in their format into WIF (Wallet Import Format): https://github.com/mycelium-com/wallet/tree/master/backuputil I takes some effort to built this tool but afterwards you ...


2

go to Tools-> Export Private Keys After you find the .key file, open it in a text editor. The key file should start with the line: “KEEP YOUR PRIVATE KEYS SAFE !” The keys start at the last # line


1

Correction: I had thought that Bitcoin Core implements BIP44, which it does not. Thus, what I previously wrote about the gap-limit was wrong. To restore your wallet-backup you place the wallet.dat into the Bitcoin Core data directory as Pieter described. When Bitcoin Core is started, it will load the wallet.dat. The wallet.dat includes the information up ...


1

I'm not sure how it got renamed with a .txt extension, but if you are in Windows and have the "hide known file extensions" setting on, than the file would appear to be named 'wallet.dat' since it will hide the '.txt' portion. Remove the ".txt" from the end, and try again to import the wallet file.


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