9

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this! Can't add comments so extend Chris.J's answer: Here are my notes on how to recover / rebuild / regenerate / extract ALL addresses and keys used by MultiBit HD: Go to https://...


8

In the current version 2.8.3 of Electrum it's very easy to import Multibit wallets (meaning, migrating from Multibit to Electrum). An important reason to migrate is because Multibit (not HD but the classic one) does not allow to change network fees, which makes it very hard or even unreliable to move funds. Select wallet in Multibit and choose Tools > ...


8

In case you have a beta7 wallet which is not BIP32 compliant you cannot use the method @chris-j has put forward. The easiest way for me was to hook into MultiBit HD's signing capabilities and log the private key being used to the console: diff --git a/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/multibit/hd/core/managers/WalletManager.java b/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/...


6

(I am one of the MultiBit devs). The MultiBit code is hosted on multibit.org ONLY. The 'tv' copy is a phishing site. DO NOT USE IT.


5

Importing private keys into MultiBit: Create a file with the extension ".key" (like "mybitcoinkeys.key") Put each private key on a separate line. Next to each private key, type a space and then the date that the private key was created (in UTC format). (this last step is important because MultiBit will only check the blockchain from that date forward) ...


5

MultiBit connects to (typically) four bitcoinds at random at start up. It then picks the best peer (using ping times, advertised blockchain height and the version of the peer to decide) and uses that as the download peer to get the block headers from. It is thus using one peer to catch up the blockchain from where it previously knew about. It listens to ...


5

That particular transaction is an attempt at something that has become known as "dust spam". The idea is that the sender sends a very small amount of bitcoin to many different addresses, hoping that people will notice and investigate further. It's possible to find out who sent this if you look hard enough, but most people won't bother. The effectiveness of ...


5

Yes your wallet file will be sufficient to recover your Bitcoin if you did not encrypt it with a password. In the future please encrypt your wallet and store backups offline


4

Electrum is not peer-to-peer (P2P). It only connects to electrum-specific servers to broadcast your transactions and to receive transactions. It's very similar to a web-wallet, however you're the one who holds the keys. So the Electrum client signs the transaction with your private key (that you hold), and then sends it to electrum-specific servers that take ...


4

The files with the .cipher suffix are the regular wallets encrypted with 256 bit AES. The password used is the one you use to first encrypt your wallet. MultiBit goes through all the unencrypted wallets, creates an encrypted copy and secure deletes the unencrypted one. You can open the .cipher wallets using File | Open wallet and it asks you for the ...


4

Define a JAVA_HOME environment variable with the path to your jre/jdk installation in it. That worked for me.


4

I can confirm that the "MultiBit" software downloadable from MultiBit.tv is a trojan. The version I downloaded seems to be slightly different than OP's, but similar. After decompiling the trojan, I found (one of?) the bitcoin-stealing changes made. Here's the original source code inside SendBitcoinConfirmAction::actionPerformed(): if (validator.validate(...


4

The reason is privacy. If you reuse the same key for every transaction, everyone who ever transacts with you can infer your entire balance. No, public keys should not be identities, exactly because the transactions to them are public too. Your ability to create many pseudonyms in the system the only way through which it has any privacy. By reusing ...


4

Because the private keys and addresses are created deterministically from your wallet words you just need to keep your wallet words safe - there is no need to expose individual private keys. You can use your wallet words to recreate your wallet in either MultiBit HD (use the Restore button on the 'Enter password' screen) or using other tools. For instance, ...


4

In 2013, MultiBit was not using Hierachal Deterministic (HD) wallets. The latest version is MultiBit HD. If you want to use the older version you can use MultiBit Classic and that should let you import your multibit.wallet file.


4

Here is what you need to do. Make sure you have the seed from multibit. Download http://www.electroncash.org/ You create a new wallet, select I already have seed, when you type seed you need to click the "options" button and select BIP39 seed. It will ask for a derivation path... you need to use: m/0' (note the ' it is important... m/0') 4.Suggest you do ...


3

Multibit creates addresses using compressed private key, while Electrum uses uncompressed private keys. You can't decompress key - it will change public address, not allowing you to use your coins. Check first letter of your exported private key from Electrum. If first letter is K or L, it's compressed. If it's 5, you have uncompressed private key. Easiest ...


3

Armory supports multiple wallets and has a scripting interface. Blockchain.info is an online wallet service that has an interface very similar to bitcoind. They also have an API to create wallets.


3

Multibit will prompt you for a password regardless of whether you are sending it to your own wallet or not. This is by design, since if it didn't do this, it would allow anyone who can access your laptop to transfer bitcoins from your encrypted wallet by sending it to the unencrypted wallet first. Sorry but unless you made an unencrypted backup of the ...


3

if you are using OS X, you can just double click /Applications/MultiBit.app/Contents/Resources/Java/multibit-exe.jar works on OS X 10.10.1, Java 7 Update 71. guess they need some minor adjust for less strict JVM/JRE version check...


3

Your wallet.dat file contains your private key. By default this is saved in clear text. Meaning that anybody who gets a hold of this file, could see the private key and therefore spend your money. When password protecting this file, to see the private key, you need a password. MultiBit uses a well known Java library to "password protect" it. It's all open ...


3

The process to decrypt a password protected .key file exported using MultiBit is explained here: https://github.com/jim618/multibit/wiki/Export%20and%20limited%20import%20of%20private%20keys To decrypt a MultiBit private key export file use: openssl enc -d -p -aes-256-cbc -a -in \<ciphertext file\> -out \<plaintext file\> -pass pass:\<...


3

Coins are gone when you can't recover your private key. If you have used a non hd wallet (and i think you did), you can check if your bitcoin wallet supports keypools. Keypools are a set of pre-generated keyprairs (pub/privkey) which can be used when a new key is required. Because generating a key (non HD) in a encrypted environment needs to unencrypted (...


3

MultiBit HD dev here. The mbhd-*.zip.aes backup files are encrypted using an AES key derived from the wallet words. Hence you need your wallet words to do a restore from one of these. The wallet that is opened normally in MultiBit HD is encrypted with your password. This is the *.wallet.aes file. You can also restore just the transactions using only your ...


3

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this, since ...just DON'T DO IT! See 1. You probably don't know the guy behind the web page well enough to trust them with your precious bitcoins. Even if you do, the site may have ...


3

MultiBit developer here. You should be able to simply spend from your Classic wallet into your new HD wallet. Don't try moving private keys around - that's really easy to get wrong and is one of the reasons we wrote HD in the first place. There are full instructions on upgrading on the MultiBit website: https://multibit.org/en/help/hd0.1/how-to-upgrade-from-...


3

The default MultiBit HD wallet uses an address generation scheme known as BIP32. Mycelium uses an address generation scheme known as BIP44. BIP44 is what Trezor uses. HD wallet interoperability is unfortunately a bit thorny. It's normally easier to have two wallets.


3

The MultiBit HD wallet can be restored with just the seed words. Click "Restore" on the unlock screen and follow the instructions.


3

Okay, some observations: MultiBit Classic 5.16 is more than two years old. The transaction you mentioned doesn't appear on either blockexplorer.com, blocktrail.com or blockchain.info. It seems that they didn't get propagated in the network. The Bitcoin transaction market has evolved in the past two years and due to a higher demand, the transaction fees ...


3

My problem was easily solved, I simply had to Repair Wallet - an option in the Manage Wallet sidebar choice. All fixed!


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible