13

Here is a fun thing about ECDSA signatures: you can always replace s with -s (mod N) and the signature is still valid. So when you are deducing the k value, it is possible that someone else flipped the sign of s and you will have to undo it. So, you have to make a list of candidates for k (kandidates?) and then select whichever one actually works. A good ...


8

One solution is to export (in your privacy) the private key connected to the address on which you received your Bitcoins (or simply all private keys). This can be done using a command line tool known as pywallet. Then, you can import this key (or all your keys) into another wallet. Browser-based wallets such as https://blockchain.info/wallet do not require ...


8

If you're programming savvy you could write a small program that searches for the regular expression of a Bitcoin private key. Bitcoin private keys have a very specific format: They are 51 keys long, start with a '5' and the second letter is either 'H', 'J', or 'K' and use base58 for the remaining 49 letters which excludes the characters 0IOl. It seems to ...


5

I did some digging into Coinbase's offline multisig tool to figure out what the user seed actually was and their derivation paths. It turns out the user seed is just that, a seed that is used to get the Master Private Key. This is done by hashing it with HMAC-SHA512 where the key is the string Bitcoin seed and the data is the binary form of the user seed (...


5

Keys are interchangeable on both chains. If you export the private key of the address you sent it to on the bitcoin cash wallet , and import it back into another wallet (Exodus for Bitcoin?) , you should see your bitcoins.


5

A) For each hierarchical deterministic account path ~2 (if detached) to ~4 (if not detached) billion private keys and associated public addresses can be synthesized. If BIP 44 technology is applied to HD wallets. The same wallet can manage multiple cryptocurrencies, see this table. B) Take a look here that concisely shows how to recover private keys and ...


5

People with 86 million dollars generally don't need to ask this. People who have been tricked by con-artists are the sort of people that usually ask this. That looks like a "blockchain" wallet. How to unlock private key of bitcoin If you have forgotten a password needed to "unlock" your wallet, you have lost all your bitcoins and will either never get ...


4

All of the information in the screenshot is publicly available. And no, they won't be useful for recovering your Bitcoin. If you used Electrum, you either need the wallet, the recovery phrase(seeds) or the private key(s) to recover you Bitcoins. Note that when you first create your wallet, you are instructed to write down the seed (12 or 13 dictionary words)...


4

The Trezor wallet is a Hierarchical Deterministic wallet. This means that the entire wallet is derived from the seed. The seed is encoded as the 24 word mnemonic which is what you have to backup. To restore the wallet, you enter the mnemonic which is converted to the seed. The private keys are then derived from the seed, and since it is the same seed and ...


4

The Trezor generates a seed offline on your device. Neither the private key nor this seed are ever shared with SatoshiLabs. In fact, you're in sole control of your private key: when you first set up your Trezor, you're being shown the 24 words that encode your seed. You have to write these words down and keep them as a backup. When you lose your Trezor, you ...


4

According to Nils's post, the z values are the hashes that get signed in the ECDSA formula. Background on what data goes into these hashes can be found on the OP_CHECKSIG wiki page and Krzysztof Okupski's excellent developer reference PDF. Bitcoin Core's code for generating the hashes is here. Any other Bitcoin application that signs transactions (or ...


4

I had to do this for a Dogecoin wallet that was very out of sync once. I will outline the steps that worked for me. My example will be for Bitcoin, though, since that's probably what most people will need. Caution: this is a bit technical, but it works. Expect this to take probably 10-30 minutes. This also assumes you are using a standard Pay-To-Pubkey-Hash ...


4

But not the former. Can anyone explain what he meant in the former? A child key can refer to two different things: the child private key and the child public key. With just only one of these two things, you cannot determine the private or public keys of any parents or siblings. Just revealing one of those keys does not necessarily reveal any other ...


4

Bitcoin Core does not use a seed phrase. Your password is simply the encryption password for the wallet.dat file. No private keys are derived from the password. In order to recover your Bitcoin, you must have the wallet.dat file.


4

This is impossible. The whole point of public key cryptography is that the public key can be shared with anybody, without compromising the private key. If there were a way to recover the private key using the public key, this would all fall apart, and in particular Bitcoin would be horribly insecure. This hasn't happened. The public key could be used ...


3

Open the console on Bitcoin Core. Type dumpprivkey and the public address. It will give you the private key. Then import the private key to whatever thin client you want.


3

No, private keys are randomly picked from the space of 256-bit numbers. A private key cannot be recovered from the address, otherwise anyone could take any other user's funds at will. If your friend doesn't have additional information such as e.g. a set of seed words, or a backup, it is infeasible to rediscover the private key.


3

Well, in both cases, your seed words are ultimately the key to the wallet. If you use a regular wallet, you open yourself up to a number of other attacks Malware on the device that runs the software wallet Keyloggers People shoulder surfing Backdoored wallet software Moreover, larger OSes like Windows, Linux, and Mac OS have considerably larger attack ...


3

While I have experienced the same situation as the person described in the video the information is only partially true. It is very well described in BOLT 03 how keys are being derived. The general derivation of the keys you are looking fore is described in this formula: privkey = basepoint_secret + SHA256(per_commitment_point || basepoint) so what you ...


3

It is not possible to compute the private key for an address, ever, unless there are severe bugs in the wallet that holds the key. Also addresses don't expire. For privacy reasons it is bad to reuse them, but their security does not depend on this. In addition the "now showing as watch-only" in your question seems confused. Addresses don't become watch-...


2

Here's a web tool for BIP32 key derivation. The only problem is the hardcoded 50k rounds of HMAC-SHA256. You do need to know how your wallet software exactly derived the master private key from the mnemonic or you'll get totally different keys. Unfortunately there's no standard convention for the HD wallet backup/restore process and I'm afraid this ranks ...


2

First off: I don't know of any recovery tools (but didn't google for them either). What I'll explain is the difficulty to guess the correct address. The wallet import format has 4 byte of checksum data. That's 8 characters. So losing the last 4 byte or part of them only loses / diminishes your ability to check for typing errors in the important part of the ...


2

Unfortunately, most of the "cloud mining" websites are ponzi schemes trying to disguise themselves as a cloud mining contract provider. This site catagorizes Bitknock as a ponzi/scam dated back to November 2015. A little bit research could have made you aware of the dangers. I personally lost dozens of bitcoin in such projects, even if I joined only the ...


2

Might want to experiment with libbitcoin's command line interface called bitcoin explorer (bx). Instructions for using v3.0 bx commands used below are found here in the right pane. Assuming there is no mnemonic password, and the associated public key is compressed, the associated BIP 32/39/44 m/44'/0'/0'/0/0 private key and address can be computed as ...


2

Typically, they just pick the first one that the mnemonic generates.


2

It turns out Bippy does have a bug in the encryption algorithm where it mixes up the public key compression flag. As pointed out, I posted this problem on reddit as well, and a solution has been posted there: Bippy is definitely doing something wrong. Technical Explanation BIP38 encrypted keys have 4 components (in the simplest case). The ...


2

Yes, but having the wallet.dat file is only enough to recover the lost bitcoins if it hasn't been compromised in the meantime (that's why it's a good idea to encrypt your wallet). There have been at least 2 other questions in the last week or two where a user tried to recover an old wallet and found it had been emptied. If you do encrypt your wallet (and ...


2

By the definition. Crypto is "unrecoverable money". If you dont like it - just dont use it. Point.


2

No, there is no way to recover a private key using only the data generated from it. If there were, Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies would instantly collapse. If you have a seed phrase (AKA wallet recovery phrase), you can re-generate the private key from that phrase. Related: Are there Bitcoin password crackers I can use to recover forgotten passwords?


1

If the address is not part of any of the wallets that you have control over than you cannot recover the private keys. Because in that case, you're basically asking the same as asking to recover the private key to anybody's bitcoin address. I'm sure you know the answer to that question. If the address is part of one of the addresses of your wallet at ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible