9

If you don't have the private key, there is no way to access those coins. Period. The security of Bitcoin as a currency relies on that fact. Either recover the private key somehow, or consider the coins gone.


5

First, don't panic! Second, make an image backup of the wiped drive to a physically different drive. Third, you maybe able to recover the deleted files with tools such as magic rescue so long as the sectors on your drive that your wallet was wiped from are intact... otherwise you may be out those coins... I've had OK luck with rescuing data off drives for ...


4

Blockchain.info has two separate "mnemonics", one for each password (using that term loosely, since it's not the type of permanent mnemonic every other mnemonic-capable wallet uses). I agree they don't make it at all clear that you gain a second one once you add a second password. It sounds like you only have the main one. If you have completely forgotten ...


4

A bitcoin private key is a random 256 bit number. A bitcoin address is deterministically derived from that private key. Everyone uses the same procedure to do so. Therefore, it is impossible to figure out where you created the wallet based one a bitcoin address. Your browser history, however, might lead you to the correct website. You can limit the websites ...


4

Is there a way to just manually transfer the btc from the old wallet into a new wallet we do have access to No. You need at least one of the things you have none of working wallet. PIN or password for the wallet. Recovery phrase for the wallet. is there any way to extract the password or private keys directly from the wallet file? No. The brute-force ...


4

Without any additional information, it is tough to provide help. Bitcoin is a decentralized network, so there is no central authority that can do something like authenticate your identity and provide access to your coins again. Understand that if you lost your ability to access the coins, they are essentially unrecoverable. Owning a bitcoin is equivalent to ...


4

TL;DR: You don't need to bruteforce anything here (at least almost), and can recover the missing last 7 characters on an average PC at home within less than 1 second using a simple Python script! In detail: In your picture there are 7 characters missing at the end of the private key (figured out by comparing with a test-printout using the same HTML file). ...


4

I had an account on a website, but don't remember which one Search your email account for an account creation confirmation email. Helpful search terms may include "bitcoin", "wallet", "exchange", "btc", "blockchain", or "cryptocurrency". If you purchased bitcoins, you may want to look at your old ...


3

No, private keys are randomly picked from the space of 256-bit numbers. A private key cannot be recovered from the address, otherwise anyone could take any other user's funds at will. If your friend doesn't have additional information such as e.g. a set of seed words, or a backup, it is infeasible to rediscover the private key.


3

zcoin seems to be a fork of Bitcoin Core. Bitcoin Core's -salvagewallet does carefully try to recover a broken wallet database (wallet.dat file). What it does is: Copy the wallet.dat file (wallet.<date>.bak) Tries to recover only the private keys Make sure you check your debug.log after -salvagewallet wallet operation. Look for lines starting with "...


3

If you purchased bitcoin in the past, there are likely only two ways you were storing it. First, you may have been storing it on some web wallet, where the keys to use the bitcoin are managed for you. If this is the case, you will likely have registered for the wallet with an email address. If you think you know which email address this was, and you still ...


3

Try searching the address at blockchain.info with the following link https://blockchain.info/address/<your_addres_here> It will give the current balance of that address, the transactions it was involved. Just in case if your bitcoins were transferred somewhere you would know.


3

MultiBit developer here. You'll need to use MultiBit Classic version 0.5.19 available as a download from the site https://multibit.org. This will allow you to open the .key file and synchronise with the block chain to recover all the funds associated with the private keys held in the file. Once you have imported the keys, we strongly recommend that you ...


3

Your money is lost without at least one of a backup of important data from the hard disk before it was formatted a backup of the wallet.dat file a note of the private key There is no way to recover the private key from other information. If there was, Bitcoin would be completely unsafe and unusable.


2

As Murch said, the mere knowledge of an address is not sufficient to be able to spend bitcoins from that address. If it was you'd be able to spend bitcoins from the recipient's address after you've paid them. In this case, you mention you lose a "Welcome to my wallet..." message. If you remember this email, you might remember what third party sent it. From ...


2

If you neither have the mnemonic, the identifier, or the wallet file, there is probably nothing that can be done to restore your wallet. Especially, the receiving address is not sufficient to restore your wallet. Otherwise, any other user could claim your wallet as it is public knowledge. Clearly, that would not be secure.


2

If you saved a copy of your wallet, I don't think you have lost your bitcoins. The bitcoin core client makes 100 addresses ahead of time (you don't have just 1 address!), and they are all stored in the wallet.dat file. Just wait until you client has finished downloading the blockchain, or follow the steps here to get them out without waiting!


2

No way to know. Bitcoin addresses are created by a random generation process, and the address itself shouldn't contain any information associating it with the site where it was created. If it did, that would weaken your privacy. The wallet site should have offered you the option to back up your private key, so you might look for those keys somewhere on ...


2

If I understand correctly, you not only do not know your private key anymore (and probably never knew), you also do not even know the BTC address where your Bitcoins are? I'm afraid I have to say that under these circumstances it is as if you never had any Bitcoins. I lost some exactly this way as you describe and actually also had purchased them in 2011. ...


2

No, not necessarily. In fact, if you actually follow the instructions given by most wallet software, you won't lose your Bitcoin. When you first setup a Bitcoin wallet, most modern wallet software will walk you through making backups of your wallet (which are not stored on your phone). Most will also force you to click through multiple dialogs of "I ...


2

1) Click Finder. 2) Press CMD + SHIFT + G 3) Paste this and press enter: ~/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin Your wallet.dat should be there.


2

No government agency or other authority keeps track of cash you put in the pocket of your old jeans or down the back of your sofa five years ago. I was just hoping that maybe it would be listed under my name Just as there's no global registry of who currently owns every $5 bill and where they put it, there's no global registry of who owns every amount of ...


2

I happened to write down the 12-word phrase. You are in a very good situation. Much better than many new bitcoin owners who ask questions here. It is very likely that your bitcoin is safe and needs no urgent action. how can I find the wallet I created? You don't need to, wallets are not important so long as you have the 12-word seed-phrase. Wallets don'...


2

If you used a wallet 8 years ago, you wouldn't have a backup seed phrase (BIP39/44 weren't created until 2013/14). So I have a feeling your timeline is off, or you never had a seed phrase in the first place. But anyways Without additional info about what wallet you were using: Generally, you'll want to find a 'wallet.dat' file (or similar), as it will ...


2

You cannot recover control over the Bitcoin amount associated with the addresses in your old wallet data file unless you have a backup of the wallet or a note of the private key.


2

It has to be brute forced. There are a couple of ways but basically it is replacing each character by base-58 chars and checking the key. The amount of time that process takes depends on the number of characters missing and slightly on whether the key is compressed or uncompressed and a little on your luck. However if your key is compressed and is missing up ...


2

That would be a very old Blockchain.info wallet, they're the only ones using a GUID for the identifier.


2

There's no such thing as a Bitcoin account. If you mean an account on a Bitcoin exchange, then I'd check your emails and maybe old bank statements from that time to see if you can find which exchange it is, then try and recover your account. If you mean a Bitcoin wallet, and you have completely lost the wallet file and have no backup of its keys, then it is ...


1

Unfortunately there are several different versions of wallet.aes.json wallets from blockchain.info, and not all of them are supported by btc recover. (iteration count). That means you might have tried the correct password with btcrecover giving you a false negative. it is possible to modify the code of btcrecover to add the other iteration versions but you ...


1

If you withdrew the BTC then you must have had a wallet somewhere to withdraw to. A wallet software could have been installed on your PC or, could be with a web wallet provider or, the balance could still be with your slots. If you have no information about your wallet (check old emails for account information from a web wallet provider), cannot remember ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible